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Jul. 1st, 2009 @ 12:01 pm perfect pitch curiosity
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toneblend:
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From:matthras
Date:July 1st, 2009 08:45 pm (UTC)
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Please bear in mind that this is a ridiculously small sample size, for starters =P.

Secondly, there are people who only have absolute pitch (like me) and those who also have relative pitch (so hence, they hear things the same way like the general populace).

Also consider that (quasi-)absolute pitch can be developed. Quasi-absolute pitch is where one can remember a single note by absolute pitch ability, and then reference all other notes to it using relative pitch.

There's a foundation of research by a guy called Miyazaki which actually points out that absolute pitch-only possessors are at a major disadvantage compared to the rest when perceiving music. Some of the studies are actually quite interesting to read.
From:toneblend
Date:July 2nd, 2009 05:30 pm (UTC)
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I have heard about quasi-absloute pitch already but it seems to be quite different. If I remember correctly people with QAP don't have instantaneous tone recognition even for their reference tone. It's more like they have to consciously compare a heard pitch to their memorized one so it's slower (but better than nothing I agree).

Would you say that each pitch has a disctinct feeling or is it more like an information (this is just a pitch that happens to be a B flat)?
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From:matthras
Date:July 2nd, 2009 10:40 pm (UTC)
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To be honest I haven't met anyone who claims QAP. My younger brother's a violinist without absolute pitch, but he can recognise the concert A when it's played (obviously because he tunes to it!) so I think that people are able to develop QAP once they learn to play a tone in their head that they are familiar with.

Both, actually. Although for me it's more an information aspect because I tend to struggle to find emotion in music in a general sense. However I do feel that 'G' is a happy note, 'A' sounds overconfident, 'Eb' is annoying, etc. but I usually identify them in an information aspect.