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Jul. 17th, 2008 @ 02:46 pm Hi again
Current Music: Orchestral Suite in C Major, BWV 1066
Hey, I've been a member of this comm in the past, but I've gotten a new journal. (Old one was noscream_bone if you care to dig back that far in the archive, lol.)

Quick recap: 17, I play bassoon, oboe/English horn, and flute/picc mainly (flute/picc as a hobby), I have AP, I speak both English and Chinese (Mandarin) natively.

So, I'm about to go off to university as a music ed/comp double major, and I have a few questions about theory/aural skills classes.

1. What are they usually like? I'm not so worried about it as I'm just curious about how it works.

2. Should I keep my absolute pitch hidden completely, let people figure it out themselves, or not even worry about it? I'm used to saying nothing about it unless asked, if that helps.
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grammarsuigintou
coranglaisman:
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From:matthras
Date:July 18th, 2008 01:04 am (UTC)
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1. Here (at Melbourne University in Australia) theory classes are plain lecture/tutorial format. Lecture on some theory plus examples, and then a tutorial to do a quick exercise and run over the material.
About my Aural Class, my lecturer is getting everyone to do singing (solfege) and rhythm exercises, on the basis that everyone initially has relative pitch (I don't!!!! Yes, I do have a degree of absolute pitch).

2. I don't think you should hide it, but at the same time if people don't ask I don't see a reason for you to blurt it out loudly :P I'm sure your Aural lecturer/tutor will ask who in your group will have absolute pitch at some point.
Figuring out someone has absolute pitch isn't easy to start with, for starters :P
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From:keakealani
Date:July 24th, 2008 05:58 am (UTC)
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sorry to semi hijack the convo, but what you said about aural classes kind of interested me. I'm a singer, so should I expect the singing there to be comparable to the stuff I do in choir in high school? Like, repeating solfege and stuff? Or is it harder than that?
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From:matthras
Date:July 24th, 2008 09:11 am (UTC)
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I'm a cellist, so I have no idea how people run choir classes :P

It seems the majority of us here in first year are learning solfege from scratch, and it's pretty much a big part in our melody singing. We have to learn melodies (memorise them for extra marks) and sing them back in either fixed or moveable solfege (the keys can vary, depending on the difficulty you're doing) whilst conducting with your hand at the same time.
In lectures he usually puts up a piece on the screen and we sing it in rounds format. He also gets different groups to sing different notes (to create a chord) and gets us to listen to how it harmonises.

If you ask me, it should probably be easier than the choir stuff you do. Especially with you being a singer you should have developed good relative pitch (by general assumption) - once you've learnt solfege in either form, my classes would be a piece of cake for you.

With rhythm exercises, it's a simple learn and repeat (no memorising is required). Of course, rhythms get progressively harder with triplets and such.

Hopefully that explains enough...feel free to ask more questions :)
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From:keakealani
Date:July 25th, 2008 02:22 am (UTC)
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Ah, that makes sense. Yeah, it pretty much sounds like the same stuff I've been doing for years. I already know solfege so that seems like it would be pretty easy for me. That's kind of reassuring, actually...while I'm sure I have a disadvantage in classes that focus on intrumentation and orchestration and stuff, it's nice to know the singing background comes in handy...relative pitch is something we almost take for granted, since it's pretty much impossible to sing without it, on some level xD

Thanks for the response...I'll be poking around more as the year goes by since I'm planning to apply for colleges next year and I'm pretty nervous about it.
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From:matthras
Date:July 25th, 2008 04:36 am (UTC)
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...relative pitch is something we almost take for granted, since it's pretty much impossible to sing without it, on some level xD

I have no relative pitch at all, no wonder I'm struggling and barely passing my solfege exercises :( Thank god my lecturer is a nice guy!
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From:por_que_no
Date:July 18th, 2008 03:00 am (UTC)
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I wouldn't worry too much. If you also have good relative pitch (which you should, playing a transposing instrument) your aural class will be a good extra naptime. I'm pretty sure they will figure out your AP pretty quickly...my first TA (who had it herself) had me pegged at the first individual exam. Your classmates might pretend to hate you though. lol
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From:sharp11
Date:July 18th, 2008 03:08 am (UTC)
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Yeah, I wouldn't worry about it too much either; but do be careful about how you say it when you do eventually reveal it. You don't want to come off as being a really cocky jerk :P

Also... yeah, usually ear training classes, especially if they are classical-based and you come from a classical background, will be completely boring. However, I am definitely of the opinion that the classes are worth going to. I had one ear training teacher in one semester who, when he found out I had AP, transposed all the sight-singing exercises for the class. For the kids who didn't have AP, it made no difference in the level of difficulty, but for me, it gave me a huge challenge that I was forced to overcome - and now my sight-transposing is a million times better! I also got a lot better at hearing jazz chord tensions (since this was primarily a jazz school). They were something I knew, but the practice in ear training got me better at identifying them more quickly. So... yeah I'm not your mom, but go to class :)
From:arrielavender
Date:November 13th, 2008 11:55 pm (UTC)
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Actually, unless you're asked, I'd say don't tell. It has been my experience that some teachers really become jealous of it and some will try to find a way to make things more difficult for you... (although there's not many ways to fool someone with AP ;)
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From:tortoises
Date:July 1st, 2009 01:25 pm (UTC)
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This is true D: I had a really bitchy music teacher in high school, and when he discovered I had perfect pitch (I think he was already jealous because I was better at playing my instruments than he was) he started picking on me and randomly asking me to name notes and weird chords, and laughed at me if my voice fell off-pitch for even a fraction of a note. SOMETIMES VOICES DO THAT, DICKHEAD.

>_> sorry. The guy was an idiot XD

Edited at 2009-07-01 01:28 pm (UTC)